Hitchhiking in Turkey - Journal of Nomads

Is Turkey dangerous? This is what we’ve learned so far!

Turkey has been portrayed in a bad light lately by the media: people dying in bomb attacks, the war between the Turks and the Kurds, the many refugees from Syria fleeing into Turkey to make their way towards Europe, the turbulent atmosphere near the borders of Syria and Iraq,…. Tourists are staying away because they are afraid. Too bad because Turkey is a spectacular country with very welcoming people!

 

One of the many breathtaking views!
One of the many breathtaking views!

 

People who haven’t visited Turkey yet assume that it’s a third world country with very strict Islamic rules. We’ve only been here for a couple of weeks but we can already say that this is not the case! The villages are still very traditional but the cities have a blend of local and international influences in the buildings, the shops and in the dress code. Some men and women are still dressed traditionally (sleeved tops, loose trousers, knee-length dresses or skirts, headscarves) while the younger generation are dressed in the same clothes we would wear in France, Belgium, Italy,…

A blend of traditional and western clothing on a market
A blend of traditional and western clothes on a market

 

A woman in traditional clothes interacting with a woman in western clothes

 

The first place we visited was Marmaris, a little city on the Aegean sea where we arrived by ferry. We noticed this is a touristic city with a lot of trendy coffee shops and restaurants. Most towns and cities located on the West Coast of Turkey are built in a more Western European style. There are lots of hotels and resorts for holidaymakers. The more inland we went, the more we saw traditional villages and towns. Apparently Turkey is very diverse depending in what area you are. The country is very big ( 783,562 sq km), has a large variety in landscapes and we’ve only seen 2 out of the 81 provinces of Turkey so far so there is still a lot for us to discover!

 

Is Turkey dangerous - Kalkan - Journal of Nomads
Kalkan, a beautiful touristic town at the Mediterranean Sea

 

Street view of a little village
Street view of a little village (Islamlar)

 

Despite of the more western look of the cities at the coast, we definitely knew we were in Turkey because we saw the flag everywhere! In the streets, on boats, on cars, on top of a hill in the middle of nowhere, hanging on the front and inside houses,… we’ve never seen so much red as in our first days in Turkey! The Turkish people have the highest respect for their flag. It’s sacred for the Muslim Turks because of the star and crescent embellished on it (the star and crescent are seen as typical Muslim symbols). For others it is a symbol for their independence, honor and history.

Boats with the Turkish flag

Another sign that we were in Turkey and specifically in a Muslim country, were the many mosques. The first time I heard the call to prayer, I had a huge smile on my face! The sound represented that we were in another culture! The Muslim are called to pray five times a day. The call is heard at dawn, at noon, in the middle of the afternoon, just after sunset and about two hours after sunset. The muezzin, a man appointed to call to prayer, climbs the high tower of the mosque, the minaret. He calls through a speaker in the Arabic language “Hasten to prayer”. That’s the moment where the people stop whatever they are doing, get out their little mat and start praying.

Awesome places to hitchhike in Turkey - Konya - Journal of Nomads

 

However in Turkey we haven’t seen people praying in public like Niko saw in Morocco and I in Senegal. We also noticed that they are not following the strict rules that other Islamic countries have. We’ve learned that Turkey is one of the few secular Muslim countries in the world. This means that there is a separation between religion and governmental state and that the people are free in their religious beliefs. Even though most Turks consider themselves Muslims, they don’t have to follow the rules of the Islam very strictly. They can go out, drink alcohol, socialize with each other in ways that other Muslim countries would see as a ‘sin’. The religion is more of a cultural thing. That’s also why a lot of women don’t wear head scarves.

How did Turkey become a secular state? After the fall of the Ottoman Empire, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk (the founder of the nation) came about and made some drastic changes in the country to detach itself from its Islamic heritage. He formed the Republic of Turkey in 1923 and abolished the Islamic justice system and adopted western justice and law methods. He made it law that women could wear their own choice of clothing (that’s why the headscarf is not obligated). He introduced the Latin alphabet (before that the Turkish language was written in Arabic) and helped a whole country to learn it. I think I don’t need to explain why he is called ‘The father of all Turks’ and why his statue and portrait can be found everywhere in Turkey, nearly as much as the Turkish flag!

I think I like this man too!
I think I like this man too!

 

We were also pleasantly surprised how open-minded most Turks are. They are so welcoming towards strangers! Okay, I’ve heard they love to sell you their merchandise but the people we’ve met were just genuinely kind and friendly without expecting anything in return! The first night Niko and I grabbed a bite in a little local restaurant. We’ve had lahmacun (we call it a Turkish pizza) and ayran (a typical Turkish yogurt drink) for only €2 each! The owner of the restaurant loved to hear us practice our Turkish with him. He offered us some free tea and even gave us a loaf of bread when we said goodbye! The next morning we went to a little coffee shop with internet (so I could send my mum a text we arrived safely in Turkey). The waitress was very friendly and happy to practice her English with us. She even went to get her mother from the kitchen to introduce us to her. Again we got offered free tea and her mother gave us a big bag full of little cakes for the road. We had not even been 24 hours in Turkey and we were already overwhelmed with gifts and tea!

Lahmacun aka Turkish pizza!
Lahmacun aka Turkish pizza!

 

And then comes the hitchhiking part. The very first time I felt a bit out of my comfort zone. It was the first time since the beginning of our travels. We’ve read about hitchhiking in Turkey but we know that every experience is different and that we had to find out for ourselves. And so far, we can only say that hitchhiking in Turkey is safe, easy and fun! The people are incredibly kind. Our first driver invited us for lunch and tea (is it possible to get a ‘tea belly’ instead of a ‘beer belly’?). We had drivers getting out of their way to drop us off in a good place to continue hitchhiking and one even gave us his umbrella when it was pouring down with rain! Remember what I wrote about Philotimo in Greece? Turks also have this attitude towards life!! You can read a beautiful example in “The Kindness of Strangers”.

 

Enjoying tea with Mustafa
Enjoying tea with Mustafa

 

Only a few days in Turkey and we already made friends!
Only a few days in Turkey and we already made friends!

 

Our first impressions of Turkey? It is not dangerous here! It is a beautiful and enriching country with many ancient traditions and historical sites to discover, an unbelievably friendly culture and very tasty food!

Our travels in Turkey have only started but we are already in love! We feel safe and welcome and can’t wait to explore more of this interesting country!

 

**Update: We eventually left Turkey after spending almost 9 months there! Read more about our journey in Turkey in our One year of hitchhiking story ! Discover the diversity and beauty of this wonderful country in our other articles about Turkey  or watch our hitchhiking adventures in the Turkey Travel Videos.

 

Is it dangerous to Travel in Turkey? Journal of Nomads
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Journal of NomadsDoğukan ÖzdemirJoan TorresCan Özyıldız~Tyrenious~ AniToria Fansub Recent comment authors
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Doğukan Özdemir
Doğukan Özdemir

LOVED your post definetely, I would just say it’s not exactly true that in every prayer people leave what they do and run to prayer. This is not common at all. Maybe for over 60+ ages but not entire country. The rest of your observations are amazing.
Thank you

Journal of Nomads

Thank you Dogukan for your comment and I’m very glad to hear that you loved the post 🙂
I think that I actually mention that the Turkish people don’t follow the strict rules like other countries with the Islamic religion, such as leaving everything to go and pray. It’s been more than a year now since we left Turkey but we often think back about the great times we had there!

Joan Torres

Great analysis! Yeah, Turkey is, perhaps, one of the most liberal Muslim countries I’ve ever been to, as it clearly has a lot of Western influence. I traveled there during Ramadan and even the women who were wearing hijab we not fasting! That was of the most surprising thing for me. And yeah, Turkey has some safety issues but this is huge country and besides some critical bomb blasts in the main cities, the rest of the country should be fine. Once you see what’s going on the ground, these kind of countries seem to be so safe and peaceful.… Read more »

Journal of Nomads

Glad you saw Turkey for what it is Joan! We recommend people to do the same: avoid the big cities and explore other areas. There is so much to see and do there! And… the government is not the people 🙂 We were received with so much kindness and hospitality, it was amazing!

Hasan
Hasan

We Black Sea people like foreigners, anchovy and tea I guess:)

Journal of Nomads

Hahaha! And what about the ‘muhlama’? 😉

BeratOzkan
BeratOzkan

I’m from Turkey. Turkey great and beautiful country.

Journal of Nomads

We agree 🙂

SüLeyman TuLuk
SüLeyman TuLuk

Turkey is not dangerous and Turkish people are very hospitable and friendly im life in Denizli/ PAMUKALE i like pamukkale because the friend meets with many tourists every year 🙂

Journal of Nomads

We loved Pamukkale and we also made good friends there!!

Emir Kurtkan
Emir Kurtkan

This is so nice,
If you are living in europe and USA, I think best way is turkey for holidays. But dont follow prepared holiday plans for tourists. Make your own plan. There is a nice facebook group like “Interrait Turkey”, Join this group ask what you want to know. They will help you, you can be friend with them.

So, please meet turkish people before coming here, You will learn, they like tourists and trying to help.

Journal of Nomads

We can only agree with that – Turkish people are super helpful and hospitable!!

muratgulen69
muratgulen69

I loved your article! I live in İstanbul and I’ve visited more than 40 cities in Turkey. I can surely say that you can find the same welcoming people every city of Turkey.

Like all the other countries in the world, you may experience little problems but they will be the part of your journey.

Thanks for your great article and do not hesitate to contact me in case of anything 🙂 I can help you about sightseeing, foods and accomodation.

Take care!

Journal of Nomads

Hi Murat!

Thank you so much for your offer. We’ve already left Turkey and had a fantastic time!
Indeed, no matter where we are or where we go, we will always face some challenges. It’s like you said, it is part of the journey. But we always try to focus on the solution instead 🙂

Warm wishes!

Recep Hilmi Tufan

Thanks for your positive comments about Turkey.

Journal of Nomads

Happy you enjoyed the article Recep!

Jason Statham
Jason Statham

All of your thoughts are literally right mate and they are strictly bounded their democrasy thats why i posed for “milli irade” also i heard too much “imam hatipler kapatılsın” from teenagers its annoying though.
Stay tuned america
Ottomans are coming 😉

BLOCKCHAINBOY
BLOCKCHAINBOY

Ignorance is the worst disease of our time… it is a scandal with all the information we have nowadays. Search smart (internet), listen carefully (people) and you will find the beauty of EVERY country!!! çok_teşekkür_ederim

Journal of Nomads

Very well said! There is beauty everywhere, one just has to focus on it!

The Great Attila
The Great Attila

A positive piece about Turkey? I’m shocked. Okay, that was a bit sarcastic. But enjoyable read. I’m sure you’ve gotten some flack for the “war between Turks and Kurds” thing. Turks and Kurds generally get along well in Turkey, unlike what the West, and much of the diaspora, want you to think. Much of the gripe come against the PKK organization, which is listed as a terrorist organization by the US and EU. The PKK hasn’t succeeded in a region wide uprising, and also they want to be the voice of the Kurds. Funny thing is, the KRG in Iraq… Read more »

Journal of Nomads

Hahaha, you prefer Raki? 😉
People indeed reacted a lot on my “war” comment and this proved my point on how the media changes situations around 🙂

The Great Attila
The Great Attila

If you’re not drinking raki, you’re not a true Turkey connoisseur. 😀

Alpay Aydın
Alpay Aydın

I’m happy you liked our country, and i am happy you expressed our country well to others!Thanks for your all good opinions 🙂 Otherwise i know what the media talks about ”war” between turks and kurds, but you all who have no idea about the Turkey should know that there is no war between us and our brothers.Wishing you all the best 🙂

Yavuz Kaya
Yavuz Kaya

bruh is it ur real thoughts if its awesome also I heard that some of your teenagers say “imam hatipler kapatılsın ” what does it mean sounds funny though 😛

Journal of Nomads

Thank you Alpay! 🙂

Can DEMİR
Can DEMİR

Thanks for your amazing thoughts and sharing your experience about Turkey. Turkey is a peaceful and welcoming country. Nobody should compare us with other Muslim countries as much as we shouldn’t compare the apples with bananas. Turkey is more than to be most secular Muslim country she is one of the most secular Muslim country in earth with most of the people strictly connected to secularism more than anything. The world is giving a war with Muslim terrorists does not means ‘War between Christians and Muslims’ The term of ‘The war between Turks and Kurds’ can not use for Turkish… Read more »

Journal of Nomads

Hi Can,
Turkey is indeed a very welcoming country. And yes, it is a very unique country, not only because it’s a secular state but for many more reasons! We already miss the cay and the chats!
Thank you for sharing your thoughts as well!

Sacid Yildiz
Sacid Yildiz

Thank you so much for your nice reviews about Turkey. We try to explain the situation in Turkey, especially in Middle Anatolia and Western Turkey, but people still not sure about travelling to Turkey. I would like to post your page everywhere I can. You are always welcome to Cappadocia. Thank you again.

Journal of Nomads

Hi Sacid, We also still get many questions from travelers who want to go to Turkey but are doubting about their safety. We hope that with this article we can still encourage people to visit. We were very sad to see how much the country is suffering from its loss of tourism. When we were in Cappadocia, it was extremely quiet there. You live in a very beautiful region Sacid! And it’s not only peaceful in Middle Anatolia and Western Turkey but also in the Black Sea Region (which is also a stunning area, we were surprised how lush it… Read more »

Osman Efe
Osman Efe

It was a very nice article. Thank you for telling the people of our country. You are amazing! Come again soon!

Journal of Nomads

Thank you Osman! And we will return one day!

Michael Spivey
Michael Spivey

Great post,I first came to Turkey in 1989 as a backpacker.I fell in love with Turkey then.I came back many times & in 2005 I packed my job in,sold my house in England & came to live here. I’ve been lucky enough to see quite a lot of this beautiful & very diverse country,firstly as a backpacker,then later in my campervan. Four years ago I met & married my Turkish wife,Ayla.We live in Samsun in the Black Sea Region & in the summer we still spend 3 months exploring in the campervan. Nowhere is guaranteed safe nowadays but people should… Read more »

Journal of Nomads

Hi Michael, thank you so much for sharing your lovely story! First you fell in love with the country, then you fell in love with a Turkish woman and now you’re living there, how amazing is that! We spent about three months in the Black Sea region and it’s very beautiful there! Like you mentioned, Turkey is very diverse, it has something for everybody, whether you like mountains, beaches, adventure, cities, history,… I also agree with you that nowadays it can be dangerous everywhere. I remember friends telling me to be careful when I entered Turkey and then there was… Read more »

Roger Damm
Roger Damm

Was you in altinkum. In the past couple of days. If so I might have spotted you

Journal of Nomads

Hi Roger,

no, it wasn’t me 🙂 My partner and I left Turkey about three weeks ago. Are you living or traveling there?

Ezgi Arslan
Ezgi Arslan

Great article, guys! You have a welcoming home in Istanbul as well 😉

Turkey is definitely not dangerous in the way that is pictured in the media, I can agree with that. Social life in big cities is like many European cities, and even more lively. But if I were you, I would not let my guard down. Don’t get me wrong, I’m saying this because, in your article, I sensed a feeling of euphoria that might cause one’s defenses to malfunction. Just a small reminder from a Turkish woman. Be safe ^,^

Journal of Nomads

Haha, thanks Ezgi! I spent a total of almost nine months in Turkey and I absolutely loved it! I was sad to leave! You’re right, the big cities like Istanbul and Ankara resemble the big European cities. And even though I never felt unsafe, I always made sure to dress appropriate depending on the city or village I was in. But I think that is just a normal thing to do when I travel, to just adjust myself to my environment. I still get a lot of questions by travelers who really want to go to Turkey but who are… Read more »

M.Levent Gezer
M.Levent Gezer

Thank you for kindly blog post about Turkey because not everyone know like this Turkey.Yes we had and still have some problems but we can see kind of acts in France or USA nowadays and these are upseting us evenif not in our country. In that reason I really thank you for post. If you wanna come Turkey again I recomend you to go Trabzon(Uzungöl and Sümela Monastery. Enjoy your trip!

Journal of Nomads

That’s one of the reasons why I wanted to share my experiences in Turkey. I remember that only one week after the explosions in Ankara, the international airport of Belgium, my home country, was also attacked. There are horrible things happening everywhere in the world but it shouldn’t stop a person from leaving their houses! I hope that I can make a difference with this article and that people will look from a different perspective on your beautiful country!

Journal of Nomads

Oh, and I visited Trabzon but didn’t go to the Uzungol and Sumela Monastery. I’ve seen photos though and it’s a great excuse to come back 🙂

faik

thank you for post! our country needs that kind opinions in theese times. if you visit ‘bursa’ i can guest you in my home and guide for travel places around here 🙂 take care.

Journal of Nomads

Thank you kindly faik!! I’m not in Turkey anymore, I left 3 weeks ago after staying almost 9 months (and I overstayed my visa while doing so – that’s how much I loved Turkey 🙂 ). But when I return I’ll definitely come for a visit!

Eric W Thompson
Eric W Thompson

I wish you good luck. I lived there 3 years. Be careful in the central and Eastern parts of the country. Be sure to keep us up on what you find.

Journal of Nomads

Hi Eric,
thank you! Where did you live in Turkey?
I’ve left Turkey now after staying for almost nine months. My partner and I hitchhiked through Central Turkey and ended up staying with a family in the East for almost three months 🙂 We also felt very safe in these parts of the country! I’ve made a summary of our travels in this post: https://www.journalofnomads.com/25photos-that-will-trigger-your-wanderlust-for-turkey/ The only part missing in this post is about our experiences in the Karadeniz area as I wrote this article just when we arrived there 🙂 Hope you’ll enjoy it!

Eric W Thompson
Eric W Thompson

Adana. We traveled a lot through Turkey and enjoyed the country. We had a few problems. Unfortunately we knew others who also did, particularly women. Our 16 year old daughter and her cousin were lucky I came up on the beach where the men were just starting to handle them. The men ran then and she cried. This was near Kizkalesi. It was for the most part a good time but I wouldn’t go back. Glad you enjoyed it.

Journal of Nomads

I’m sorry to hear about that Eric! Unfortunately women get harassed in a lot of countries. When I was traveling alone in Senegal, Egypt and even Australia, I often had to deal with intrusive men. Whenever I went somewhere by myself in Turkey, I got looks (which is not unusual, I get easily noticed because of my ‘golden’ hair) but not once did I get harassed. I hope this is not the reason why you don’t want to go back to Turkey…

Koray
Koray

It is very kind of you to spend time to share your experience with all the people here. While my reading your blog, I really feel strange cause of your observations which come you different like offering free tea, bread or cookies. We are so used to such traditions in daily life here. I m pretty sure you ve experienced more during your trip. I d like to correct a statement which would cause misunderstanding. You told there the war between Turks and Kurds ” this is not true we are in same body and we are all brothers here.… Read more »

Journal of Nomads

Hi Koray, Thank you for sharing your thoughts with me! What is part of your culture and nature and what you see as normal, can be for someone else a completely new experience! In my home country (Belgium) people wouldn’t invite strangers that easily! I can honestly say that we gained a few kilo’s when we left Turkey because of all the invitations we had. it was amazing and I feel so much gratitude towards the hospitable mentality of your country! About me mentioning ‘the war between the Turks and Kurds’, a lot of people rectified this too. This is… Read more »

Yavuz Karacabey
Yavuz Karacabey

Very nice observations about Turkey. I really liked your positive remarks regarding the people and the culture here. If you ever decide to visit Ankara I would love to take you out for a few drinks and to introduce the city. Safe travels!

Journal of Nomads

Thank you Yavuz!
That would be great!! We just left Turkey a few weeks ago but when we return, we would love to share a few drinks with you!

Damla
Damla

And of course ÇANAKKALE ! Excellent

GettingOlder58
GettingOlder58

Overall a very accurate article on my former home away from home. You still have plenty to see and experience. I have spent many years in and out of Turkey Officially and for Pleasure. Assigned in Ankara 86/88.(Joint Services) Assigned in Izmir 89/91 (NATO) Numerous Temporary Duty Trips 91/96 Istanbul, Ankara, Diyarbakir, Izmir. Vacations every 2 years with wife and son (Izmir/Ayvalik) her home town. 96/04. Ankara, Istanbul, Mersin, Bodrum 02/04, Istanbul 04/05. I have driven from Istanbul to Izmir along the coast and back. Driven from Ankara to Istanbul and back and forth many times and in all weather.… Read more »

Journal of Nomads

Thank you so much for all your suggestions! It is also really nice to read about your experiences. I’ve spent a total of almost nine months in Turkey and saw a very big part of the country. The food was delicious, I loved the Ayran and like you said, when you’re polite and kind, it definitely gets rewarded! My partner and I were so surprised and touched by the kindness and hospitality of the people!! We will definitely return to explore the cities and places that we didn’t have the chance yet to visit. I’ll keep my fingers crossed for… Read more »

GettingOlder58
GettingOlder58

Enjoy your life’s travels… you are only as old as your bones and feet… when they give, it is less hoofing and more cruising. While in Ankara or Istanbul… Dulmus up hill and walk down… save your feet and knees. Whatever you do, enjoy.

Journal of Nomads

Thank you!! And you too!

Damla
Damla

Turkey,,, İZMİR, ÇEŞME , İSTANBUL, BODRUM, ESKİŞEHİR, BURSA, EDİRNE, KUŞADASI.. very very beautifulll 🙂 ! absolute you should go 🙂

Journal of Nomads

Thank you for your suggestions Damla!! 🙂
We haven’t seen all these places yet but it’s a definitely a reason for us to come back and explore more!

Rindaloo
Rindaloo

Hey good suggestions by Damla BUT, what about Fethiye and its surroundings!!!! 🙂 Don’t forget us. Next time, eh! 😉

Journal of Nomads

We didn’t forget about Fethiye! Well, we were not in the city but we spent about three months in the region. We did some house-sitting in Kalkan and it is absolutely gorgeous there!!

Rindaloo
Rindaloo

No, that was aimed at Damla 😉 Loved your blog post. Have shared link on my FB wall. 🙂 Hopefully when you come again, you will make it to here. x

Rindaloo
Rindaloo

LOL, I meant that bit for Damla comment image comment image comment image comment image 😉 Loved your blog and posted a link on my FB wall. It’s been well received 🙂 Hopefully you will make it to Fethiye next time you are over 🙂

Journal of Nomads

Thank you for sharing the post! And yes, Fethiye is now definitely on our list!

Rindaloo
Rindaloo

Yaaay!!!! Well, when you come, can I recommend the Paspatur area of Fethiye, not far from the sea (old buildings, Mosque and Hamam plus souvenir shops, spice shops, jewellers and restaurants. Then there’s Kaya Koy over the mountain behind Fethiye which has the Ghost Village (THAT needs Googling) and was where Louis De Bernieres based “Birds Without Wings”. Then there’s Oludeniz a short distance away which is a resort area complete with paragliding off Baba Dag (6500ft high) and Gemlier Bay. Both stunning as you arrive. Sunsets to die for. Yesiluzumlu is about 25 minutes drive away from Fethiye and… Read more »

Journal of Nomads

Haha, that’s ok! We love that kind of enthusiasm! We won’t be coming any time soon though. Unfortunately we left Turkey about three weeks ago and are now moving towards Central Asia. But we will definitely come back one day and we’ll give you a big shout 😉

Rindaloo
Rindaloo

Hey, what about Fethiye and its surroundings!!!! 🙂 Don’t forget us. Next time, eh! 😉

Yvonne Alpan
Yvonne Alpan

Thank you Turkey is a great country and nice to see you saw it for what it really is and not what the papers sometime make it out to be. We need more positive comments about Turkey.

Journal of Nomads

Hi Yvonne, we’re also very happy that we didn’t listen to the media and experienced Turkey with an open mind and heart. It is a fantastic country and we’re like a broken record, we keep repeating how wonderful the Turkish people are 🙂 This is why I wrote this article, because I want our readers and the world to know how great it is and how they shouldn’t be influenced by the negativity of the media!

Yvonne Alpan
Yvonne Alpan

Lets hope, like you, lots of other people will kick the trend and come and visit. I love living here (20 odd years now). Yes, just like other peoples comments, some family and friends just don’t get it, I see it now as their problem now, not mine.

Hanna
Hanna

I just loved your ideas!!!! I have spent 6 months in Turkey as ERASMUS student. Everybody said I am crazy to go there for such a long time as everybody think is not safe for girls.. I share the same feelings about Turkey as you. I just loved staying there, the culture, the places I visited, the amazing food and the best of all PEOPLE 🙂 I just met friendly and helpfull people. I am eager to travel or stay there again.

Türkiye çok çok seviyorum!!!!!

Journal of Nomads

I’m happy we think the same way about Turkey Hanna! Bende Türkiye çok seviyorum :)!!

Fatih Koç
Fatih Koç

biz de seni seviyoruz hanna!

Anan Ananov
Anan Ananov

Wher are you from Hanna ?

Marvin Sowers
Marvin Sowers

Very good post! We love Turkey, especially the people. Everyone was always so friendly and gracious. We can’t wait to go back again!

Journal of Nomads

This is what makes Turkey so great: the kind, generous, hospital and beautiful people! I’m happy you’ve experienced that too Marvin!

Alper Kavusturan
Alper Kavusturan

I’m really glad to read this text. Thank you so much and i think you had more friends from Turkey than before this text. Best wishes from Istanbul

Journal of Nomads

I’m happy to hear that Alper!! And yes, we received so many invitations now to meet people and stay with them that it is a pity we left Turkey about 3 weeks ago! We definitely hope to come back one day!!