Samarkand Travel Guide - Things to do in Samarkand in one day - Journal of Nomads

Samarkand City Guide – Things to do in Samarkand in One Day

 

The Complete City Guide to Samarkand, Uzbekistan’s magnificent Silk Road City. 

In this guide, you’ll find everything you need to know about traveling to Samarkand. I also added an itinerary to visit Samarkand if you only have one day in this stunning ancient city.

 

Samarakand Uzbekistan Travel Guide -Things to do in Samarkand - Journal of Nomads

 

Samarkand is famous for being one of the most important sites on the Silk Road and the city has been at the crossroads of world cultures for more than two millennia.

It’s one of the oldest cities in the world. It was founded around the 7th century BC, making it even older than Rome!

 

Samarkand Travel - One day itinerary Uzbekistan - Journal of Nomads

 

One of the main reasons to visit Samarkand is to marvel at the stunning Islamic architecture of its mosques and mausoleums. Poets and historians described the city as “The Pearl of the Eastern Muslim World”.

 

If you love UNESCO World Heritage sites, unique masterpieces of ancient architecture, glittering minarets, dazzling turquoise domes and hypnotic mosaics, then you’ll love Samarkand!

 

Samarkand Uzbekistan

 

 

Things to know before visiting Samarkand

 

I’ve already visited Samarkand twice. The first time was in December 2017 and I paid a second visit to the city in August 2019.

 

When I traveled for the first time to Samarkand, I expected to see a scenic old town like Bukhara. This was definitely not the case.

 

The main sights are quite spread out over the city and most of it has been heavily restored making it a bit similar to Khiva. While it’s still all beautiful and magnificent, I find it lacks authenticity. You don’t really get the feeling you’re walking around a city with a thousand-year-old history.

 

You’re also not going to be the only person who’s visiting this beautiful ancient city… 

 

Samarkand City Guide - points of interest Samarkand - Journal of Nomads

 

In 2017 it was already quite a touristic city and since my second visit in 2019, the number of tourists has tripled!  

 

Samarkand is currently THE hotspot of Uzbekistan, especially since the country introduced free visas on arrival. As tourism is growing, so is the number of souvenir stands that are spilling out of every nook and cranny around the main sights.

 

If you’re hoping to take beautiful pictures of the stunning Islamic architecture without any tourist bombing your photo, you’ll have to be very patient!

 

Things you need to know before traveling to Samarkand Uzbekistan - Journal of Nomads

 

The best time for photography is at sunrise or sunset. Not only is the light at that time of the day the best, but you also won’t see many other tourists that could block your view. 

 

But don’t let the crowds put you off. Samarkand is definitely still worth visiting and will be a highlight of your travels in Uzbekistan. 

 

Another thing I would recommend is to install the app of maps.me on your phone and download the map of Uzbekistan. Out of experience, I can tell that GoogleMaps hasn’t been working very well in Uzbekistan and Central Asia. 

 

Uzbekistan Travel - Samarkand City Guide - Journal of Nomads

 

 

Is it safe to travel to Samarkand

 

When I traveled for the first time to Uzbekistan and Samarkand in 2017, I was a bit worried about my safety.

 

I was traveling alone as a woman, I didn’t know many people who had been there before and the country was a bit of a mystery to me. 

 

But I can guarantee you, Uzbekistan is a country where you don’t have to worry about your safety and Samarkand is a very safe city, even if you’re traveling as a woman by yourself. The Uzbeks are very friendly and have no bad intentions whatsoever.

 

 

I walked around Samarkand with my camera exposed and I even went out alone in the evening when it was already dark and nobody ever bothered me.

 

There might be cases of petty crime such as pickpockets, especially in crowded places and in bazaars, but they don’t happen often. Just always keep your valuables in a safe place, no matter where you are in the world.

 

The only thing in Samarkand that you’ll have to watch out for is getting ripped off. Unfortunately, as with almost every touristic destination in the world, taxi drivers and salesmen love to overcharge ignorant tourists by doubling (or even tripling) the standard rate and prices. 

 

Know that the standard rate for getting around Samarkand by taxi is 4000 UZS. To get from the station to the city center is usually 5000 UZS. Never get into a taxi before agreeing on the price.

 

If you’re at a bazaar or in a shop, bargain down the price at least half of what is asked.

 

Uzbekistan markets - Journal of Nomads

 

Uzbekistan also introduced the ‘tourist police’. You’ll find their boots in every touristic city. So in case you’d ever feel unsafe – which I highly doubt – just go to one of those touristic police stands and they will help you. 

 

Is it safe to travel to Uzbekistan - Tourist Police Uzbekistan - Journal of Nomads

 

In case you’re still having questions about your safety in Uzbekistan, read:

Is it safe to travel to Uzbekistan?

 

 

Things to do in Samarkand in One Day

 

For being the second largest city of Uzbekistan, it isn’t actually that big and you can easily visit all Samarkand’s points of interest in one day.

 

The main attractions are quite spread out over the city but if you follow the order in which I listed them below, you can visit all the places on foot while getting a good sense of the city’s vibe.

 

 

Tip: Install the app Maps.me, download the map of Uzbekistan and bookmark these places in the app. GoogleMaps isn’t very accurate in Central Asia but Maps.me does the job and works offline as well!

 

1. University Boulevard

Most hotels and hostels are located near University Boulevard Street. If yours happens to be there as well, a nice way to start your day is to follow this street towards Gur-e-Amir, the first mausoleum on this itinerary.

 

The 128-meter long boulevard is lined with oak and plane trees, making it a nice green area in the midst of the city.

 

The University Boulevard is Samarkand’s educational and scientific center as several universities, schools and institutes are located near it. You’ll often see students walking or sitting there with their books in the shade of the trees. 

 

Samarkand Uzbekistan University Boulevard students

 

At the end of University Boulevard Street, you’ll see the statue of Amir Timur, one of Uzbekistan’s greatest rulers (I’ll tell you more about him later on). 

 

This statue of Timur sitting on his throne is right at the intersection between the old Uzbek town and the Russian-designed new town in Samarkand. 

 

Monument Amir Timur Samarkand Uzbekistan

 

Once you’ve reached this statue, go to the right and as your next stop will be Gur-e-Amir mausoleum, the place where Amir Timur was buried.

 

2. Gur-e-Amir Mausoleum or the Mausoleum of Amir Timur

Gur-e-Amir, meaning “Tomb of the King” in Persian, is a beautiful architectural complex with a ribbed turquoise dome.

 

Gur-e-Amir Places of interest Samarkand Uzbekistan

 

The exterior decoration of the mausoleum consists of blue, turquoise and white tiles organized into geometrical and epigraphic ornaments against a background of terracotta bricks.

 

Gur-i-Amir - places to visit Samarkand Uzbekistan - Journal of Nomads

 

The interior of the mausoleum is even more spectacular!  Geometric panels shine with radiating stars, beside niches hung with stalactites molded from papier-mache painted blue and gold.

 

Interior Gur-e-Amir Samarkand Uzbekistan - Journal of Nomads

 

The inner dome drips an intricate gilded coating around high lattice windows. 

 

Interior Gur-e-Amir Samarkand Uzbekistan - Journal of Nomads

 

In the middle of the room, you’ll see ornately carved headstones, indicating the location of actual tombs in a crypt directly underneath the main chamber. These tombs are the final resting places of Amir Timur, his sons, and grandsons. 

 

Mausoleum Amir Timur - Interior Gur-e-Amir Samarkand Uzbekistan - Journal of Nomads

 

Now, who’s this Timur-guy? 

 

Amir Timur, also known as Tamerlane, was born in Shakhrisabz, a city located at 80km from Samarkand. 

 

He was a complex and multifaceted man that definitely left his mark as one of Uzbekistan’s and Central Asia’s most important rulers and historical figures.

 

He founded the Timurid Empire with Samarkand as its center and expanded his empire from the Volga River and the Caucasian ridges in the west to India in the Southwest. 

 

Timur wasn’t only a great conqueror but also a great builder. He’s the man behind the greatest constructions in Samarkand, including the Bibi Khanym Mosque, Shah-i-Zinda, the Ulugh Beg madrasah at Registan, the Ulug Beg Observatory and the Gur-e-Amir mausoleum.

 

He also built the Mausoleum of Khoja Ahmed Yasawi in Turkestan, Kazakhstan. 

 

Tips for visiting Gur-e-Amir:

  • Visit Gur-e-Amir as soon as it opens to avoid the crowds. The interior room of the mausoleum might be large but it quickly gets noisy and crowded inside when tour groups and their chatty guides visit this place. 

 

Interior Gur-e-Amir Samarkand Uzbekistan - Journal of Nomads

 

  • Gur-e-Amir is also a great photography location during sunrise and at night when lights illuminate this stunning complex. 

 

Gur-e-amir Samarkand Uzbekistan

 

Entrance fee Gur-e-Amir: 25.000 UZS (around € 2.50 or $2.60) + 30.000 UZS extra (€3 or $3.20) if you want to take photos.

Opening hours Gur-e-Amir: open daily from April to October from 8.00 am until 7.00 pm and from November to March from 9.00 am until 5.00 pm

 

3. The Registan

The Registan is about 10 minutes walking from Gur-e-Amir.  This central square THE most iconic sight of Samarkand and Uzbekistan. 

 

Backpacking to Uzbekistan - Everything you need to know - Samarkand - Registan - Journal of Nomads

 

All the main roads of Samarkand lead to Registan as it was the heart of the Timurid dynasty.  It was used as a public square for royal proclamations, celebrations, and public executions. 

 

The square was also a place where you could buy goods from farmers and artisans from all around the world. Registan means “sandy place” or “desert” in Persian as it used to be covered by sand.

 

Registan Samarkand Top Places to visit - Uzbekistan - Journal of Nomads

 

There are 3 stunning madrasahs framing the square. Madrasah is the Arabic word for an Islamic school, college or university.

 

The Tilya-Kori Madrasah is the middle one. This madrasah has a 2-storied main facade, a courtyard surrounded by dormitory rooms and a mosque in the western section of the courtyard.

 

 

The madrasah was used as a residence for the students but the dormitory rooms are now transformed into little souvenir shops. 

 

Tilya-Kori Madrasah Registan Samarkand Uzbekistan

 

The interior walls of the mosque are abundantly gilded and that’s exactly what Tilya Kori means in the Persian language – “gilded”.

 

Mosque Registan Samarkand Uzbekistan

The walls and the ceiling of the mosque

 

 

Facing the Tilya-Kori Madrasah, you’ll see the Ulugh Beg Madrasah on the left. It’s the oldest madrasah in Samarkand.

 

 

It was built by Ulugh Beg and the man himself gave lectures there. The Ulugh Beg Madrasah was one of the best universities of the Muslim Orient.

 

The Sher-Dor Madrasah is the third madrasah on the square. Sher means tiger and the name of the madrasah comes from the images on the portal: two big tigers carrying a sun on their backs. 

 

Sher-Dor Madrasah - Registan - Samarkand - Uzbekistan

 

These images are very interesting as it’s prohibited in the Islam religion to paint images of living beings on religious buildings. 

 

Tips for visiting the Registan:

  • The best time to visit the Registan is early in the morning before the crowds arrive (most people usually arrive there between 10 and 11 am) and the souvenir shops open. 

 

Registan - Places to see Samarkand - Uzbekistan - Journal of Nomads

 

  • The Registan is a beautiful location for sunrise photography. Unfortunately, when I was there in the summer, there was a big stage right in the middle of the square so I couldn’t take nice sunrise photos. 

 

  • I also recommend visiting the Registan at night. The lights come on after sunset and illuminate all three of the stunning buildings. It’s a great time to enjoy the square as most tourists are gone by then. 

 

Registan at night - Things to do in Samarkand - Journal of Nomads

 

Entrance fee for the Registan: 40.000 UZS

Opening hours of the Registan: open daily from April to October from 8.00 am until 7.00 pm and from November to March from 9.00 am until 5.00 pm.

If you enter the Registan 15 minutes before closing time, they will allow you to stay for at least one hour longer. If you’re into photography, this is the moment to take beautiful captures of the lights illuminating the madrasahs. 

 

Registan Samarkand at night - Things to do in Samarkand - Journal of Nomads

 

Once you feel fulfilled by all the beauty of Registan, head right to Islom Karimov Street for the next point of interest.

 

You’ll see that this street is more like a fancy boulevard, framed by trees and souvenir shops.

 

Look out for an ice-cream shop halfway the boulevard. I have no details about its name but they have some super yummy ice-cream there!!

 

If you’re already feeling hungry on your way to Bibi Khanym Mosque, stop at the Bibikhanum Teahouse (see where to eat in Samarkand) for a nice lunch in their garden. 

 

4. Bibi Khanym Mosque

The Bibi Khanym Mosque is one of the most important monuments of Samarkand. It was named after the wife of Timur the Great. 

 

Bibi Khanym Mosque Registan Samarkand

 

It was built by Amir Timur himself and he wanted to make it into the most magnificent mosque of the Islamic world. 

 

However, Timur got a bit too ambitious. He wanted to go too big too fast. He pushed the building techniques of that time to their limit and encountered so many structural problems that the mosque wasn’t built to last. 

 

Despite the renovation and reconstruction, the mosque slowly started to deteriorate until an earthquake in 1897 left the building in ruins.

 

Bibi Khanym Mosque Registan Samarkand - Attractions Samarkand

 

The mosque is now slowly getting restored (with proper building techniques…). 

 

Bibi Khanym Mosque Registan Samarkand - Attractions Samarkand

 

Some areas of the courtyard are off-limits due to the reconstruction but despite the current restoration work, the Bibi Khanym mosque is a striking building and will impress you. 

 

The mosque is generally not very crowded so it offers many photography opportunities and it’s nice to spend some time relaxing in the garden of the courtyard. 

 

Bibi Khanym Mosque Registan Samarkand - Attractions Samarkand

 

Directly opposite the mosque, you can visit the mausoleum of Bibi Khanym. 

 

Entrance fee Bibi Khanym Mosque: 25.000 UZS

Opening hours Bibi Khanym Mosque: open daily from April to October from 8.00 am until 7.00 pm and from November to March from 9.00 am until 5.00 pm

 

5. Siyob Bazaar

Siyob Bazaar, also called Siab bazaar, is the largest bazaar in Samarkand. It’s right next to Bibi Khanym Mosque.

 

Siyob Bazaar - places to visit Samarkand Uzbekistan

 

It’s a typical Central Asian market where both locals and foreigners can shop for food, spices, nuts, candy, fruits, and vegetables. Vendors will call out to you, offering to taste their goods.

 

Siyob Bazaar - places to visit Samarkand Uzbekistan

 

There are also some stalls selling Uzbek souvenirs. 

 

Siyob Bazaar - places to visit Samarkand Uzbekistan

 

After having visited many bazaars throughout Central Asia, the Siyob Bazaar feels a bit touristy but it’s still a nice market to visit. Just get your bargaining skills up as it’s likely to get ripped off here as a foreigner. 

 

Siyob Bazaar - places to visit Samarkand Uzbekistan

 

Entrance fee Siyob Bazaar: free

Opening hours Siyob Bazaar: open daily from 5.00 am until 7.00 pm, closed on Monday

 

After your visit to the Siyob Bazaar, keep walking north towards the end of the boulevard until you reach the crossroads. Cross the bridge and go to the right until you reach the Shah-i-Zinda Complex.

 

6. Shah-i-Zinda Complex

Shah-i-Zinda is my favorites (photography) location in Samarkand.

 

I mean, there are many dazzling minarets, colorful buildings and shiny turquoise domes to be found in the city and across the country but this complex just has that little something extra. 

 

Top places to see in Samarkand - Shah-i-Zinda Samarkand Uzbekistan

 

It’s not just only eye candy if you love colorful mosaics but there’s something magical and mysterious about this blue-tiled maze.

 

Top places to see in Samarkand - Shah-i-Zinda Samarkand Uzbekistan

 

Shah-i-Zinda is a necropolis that consists of rows of blue tombs and various mausoleums grouped along a narrow avenue.

 

Top places to see in Samarkand - Shah-i-Zinda Samarkand Uzbekistan

 

It’s the burial place of many royals and nobles, including a number of Timur’s relatives. 

 

The legend goes that the Prophet Muhammad’s cousin, Kusam ibn Abbas, was buried here. 

 

He preached Islam in this region and Shah-i-Zinda, which means “the Living King” in Persian, is now an important and sacred pilgrimage center.

 

Top places to see in Samarkand - Shah-i-Zinda Samarkand Uzbekistan

 

Be aware that Shah-i-Zinda is a sacred place where many pilgrims come to pray and pay their respects. Be respectful during your visit and don’t go all Instagram-crazy by twirling around in dresses. Make sure to dress modestly as well. 

 

Top places to see in Samarkand - Shah-i-Zinda Samarkand Uzbekistan

 

You’re also not allowed to take photos next to the tombstones and/or sit on them, you can’t put money on the graves and you’re not allowed to sacrifice animals on the tombs (in case you were planning to bring a sheep or a goat on your trip …)

 

Tips for visiting Shah-i-Zinda:

  • During the day the complex receives many visitors – tourists and pilgrims – but if you go late and wait until sunset, you won’t only find the place nearly empty (great for photography), you’ll also get to see how the golden light gently caresses these beautiful mausoleums and tombs.

 

Sunset Shah-i-Zinda Samarkand Uzbekistan

 

  • If you’re a bit earlier and you’re waiting for the sunset, walk to the end of the pathway between the mausoleums. The complex opens up into Samarkand’s main cemetery, which is also worth a visit. 

 

  • Shah-i-Zinda opens very early in the morning, which is also a good moment to photograph the complex without loads of people getting in the way

 

Entrance fee Shah-i-Zinda: 15.000 UZS

Opening hours Shah-i-Zinda: Open daily from 7.00 am until 7.00 pm

 

Once you paid the entrance fee to Shah-i-Zinda, you can walk in and out of the complex throughout the day.

 

My suggestion is to visit this necropolis, then walk towards the back of the complex and into Samarkand’s main cemetery. From there you continue walking to the Hazrat -Khizr Mosque (see below) and later return to Shah-i-Zinda for sunset. 

 

7. Hazrat-Khizr Mosque

The Hazrat-Khizr Mosque isn’t the most attractive mosque of Samarkand and is usually not mentioned on many lists of things to do in Samarkand but it’s in my opinion still worth a visit.

 

This mosque was built in the 7th century, making it one of the oldest mosques in the world and the very first that has been built in Samarkand and Uzbekistan. 

 

Hazrat-Khizr Mosque Samarkand Uzbekistan

 

Hazrat Khizr was an important prophet in Islam. There is a belief that he lived in the time after Abraham and that he was granted immortal life, although Islamic theologians reject these beliefs. 

 

You’ll see that the Hazrat Khizr mosque has been heavily restored. It’s not as spectacular as the other mosques and mausoleums in Samarkand but the woodwork is beautiful.

 

If you don’t feel like paying the entrance fee to visit this mosque, which is mostly a museum now, at least walk on the hill on which it is located to enjoy the stunning panoramic view over Samarkand. You’ll see a lot of glittering domes and shiny minarets popping out in the sunlight!

 

Entrance fee Hazrat Khizr: 15.000 UZS

Opening hours Hazrat Khizr: Open daily from 8.00 am until 6.00 pm

 

 

 

Where to eat in Samarkand

 

1. Bibikhanum Teahouse

Bibikanum Teahouse is a lovely restaurant with an outside seating space. They serve tasty Uzbek dishes and also have vegetarian options.

 

During my last visit to Samarkand, I enjoyed a nice lunch there. It’s a great place to relax and eat while sightseeing in Samarkand as it’s located on Islom Karimov street, between Registan and the Bibi Khanym mosque.  

 

 

2. Old City Restaurant

This cozy restaurant has an Uzbek, European and vegetarian cuisine. It’s also a vegan-friendly place, which is quite hard to find in Uzbekistan.

 

Old City Restaurant offers delicious meals for reasonable prices in a warm and welcoming atmosphere. It’s said to be one of the best restaurants in Samarkand.

 

 

3. Cafe Magistr

Cafe Magistr is located between Gul-e-Amir and Registan Square. I went there a couple of times during my first visit to Samarkand.

 

They offer both Uzbek dishes as western food (I needed a break from all the plov and shashlik), the prices are very reasonable (especially when you’re on a budget) and they also serve good coffee. 

 

 

Gur-e-amir Samarkand Uzbekistan - Journal of Nomads

 

 

Where to stay in Samarkand

 

There is nowadays a wide range of hotels and hostels where you can stay during your visit to Samarkand. Here are some of my personal recommendations:

 

1. Low-budget (less than €10)

Amir Hostel

I stayed in Amir Hostel during my first visit to Samarkand and really felt very good here!

 

The owners were very welcoming and the location of the hostel is located at a 20-minute walking distance from Registan Square.

 

Check out the rates and availability for “Amir Hostel”

 

2. Mid-range (between €20 – €30)

Alisher Hotel

Alisher Hotel is a family-owned business, run by very warm and helpful people.

 

The rooms are clean and comfortable, the breakfast is very tasty and there’s even an inner yard where you can relax.

 

The hotel is right in front of the Shah-i-Zinda complex and at a 20-minutes walking from Registan Square.

 

Check out the rates and availability for “Alisher Hotel”

 

3. Luxurious (+€50)

Platan

If you like to splurge a bit, you’ll definitely get value for your money at this 4-star hotel!

 

Platan is a small and luxurious hotel with a well-kept garden and a good atmosphere. 

 

The rooms are huge and clean with great facilities (like a coffee machine in the room!) and the hotel is located at a 30-minute walking distance from Registan Square.

 

Check out the rates and availability for “Platan”

 

Is Samarkand Safe - Journal of Nomads

 

 

When is the best time to visit Samarkand

 

Samarkand can be visited all year round but I’d say that early autumn (September and October) and spring (April and May) would be the best time to visit the city. 

 

Summers (June till August) are usually very hot in Uzbekistan. I’m talking about temperatures between 35°C and 40 °C, sometimes even hotter!). If you’re not good with the heat, it might be too hot to do some sightseeing during those months.

 

Winters (December till February) are also lovely though. I went to Samarkand for the first time in December. It wasn’t too cold and if you’re lucky, you might get to see the stunning architecture coated in snow.

 

Winters are also the least touristic months so you won’t have to share the places with big crowds. 

 

When is the best time to visit Samarkand Uzbekistan - Journal of Nomads

 

 

How to get to Samarkand

 

Samarkand is located in north-eastern Uzbekistan, close to the border with Tajikistan.

 

It is easy to travel from other cities in Uzbekistan to Samarkand by bus and by train.

 

I recommend you check out my guide about traveling around Uzbekistan by public transport in which I explain in detail how it works to take the train and bus in Uzbekistan. 

 

Afrosiyob Fast train Uzbekistan - Train Travel Uzbekistan - Journal of Nomads

Inside the Afrosiyob – the high-speed train in Uzbekistan

 

1. How to get from Tashkent to Samarkand

The easiest and fastest way to travel from Tashkent to Samarkand is by train.

 

There are 2 types of trains – the Afrosiyob and the Sharq – that run from Tashkent to Samarkand.

 

The Afrosiyob is the high-speed train and takes you from Uzbekistan’s capital to Samarkand in a bit more than 2 hours. It runs daily in the morning and in the evening.

 

The Sharq goes slower, the journey from Tashkent to Samarkand takes a bit more than 3 hours but is significantly cheaper than the Afrosiyob. It runs daily in the morning, except on Thursdays.

 

You can check the train schedule on the official Uzbekistan Railway website.

 

This website offers you the chance to purchase tickets online but the system doesn’t work properly yet. We’ve heard other travelers complain that they never received their ticket, even when they paid for it. 

 

The best way is to go buy your ticket directly at the ticket office right next to the northern Tashkent Railway Station (see map below), preferably one day in advance. This is also where the train to Samarkand leaves from.

 

Train Station Tashkent Uzbekistan - Journal of Nomads

Tashkent Railway Station

 

You can get to this train station by taking the metro to Tashkent Station or by taxi. Don’t forget to bring your passport!

 

 

2. How to get from Bukhara to Samarkand

The easiest and fastest way to travel from Bukhara to Samarkand is by train.

 

There are 2 types of trains – the Afrosiyob and the Sharq – that run from Bukhara to Samarkand.

 

The Afrosiyob is the high-speed train and takes you from Bukhara to Samarkand in a bit less than 1.5 hours. It runs daily in the morning and in the evening.

 

The Sharq goes slower, the journey from Bukhara to Samarkand takes a bit more than 2 hours but is significantly cheaper than the Afrosiyob. It runs daily around noon, except on Tuesdays.

 

You can check the train schedule on the official Uzbekistan Railway website.

 

This website offers you the chance to purchase tickets online but the system doesn’t work properly yet. We’ve heard other travelers complain that they never received their ticket, even when they paid for it. 

 

The best way is to go buy your ticket directly at the ticket office right next to the train station of Bukhara (see map below).

 

Bukhara train station - Journal of Nomads

Bukhara train station

 

As this train station is a 20-minute drive from the old city of Bukhara, I’d recommend you buy your train ticket upon your arrival. This will save you from making the journey to the train station twice. A taxi from the old city to the train station costs 20.000 UZS. 

 

 

3. How to get from Penjakent (Tajikistan) to Samarkand

In case you’re traveling in the Fann Mountains of Tajikistan and you want to hop into Uzbekistan to visit Samarkand, it is possible now!

 

The Penjakent-Samarkand border has opened again so you can easily cross this land border between Tajikistan and Uzbekistan. Just check in advance if you need to apply for an Uzbek visa. 

 

You can take a taxi from Penjakent city center to the border for around 3 US$. It’s a 30-minute drive.

 

Once you’ve crossed the border, you can take a taxi there to the city center of Samarkand. This takes another 30-minute drive and costs around 40.000 UZS.

 

Things to do in Samarkand in one day - Journal of Nomads

 

I hope you enjoyed this city guide to Samarkand and I wish you a fantastic time in this magical city! In case you want to add something to this list or if you have any questions, feel free to leave a comment below or send me an email!

 

Samarakand Uzbekistan Travel Guide -Things to do in Samarkand - Journal of Nomads

 

In case you’re also planning on visiting more places, definitely check out our other guides on Uzbekistan!

 

KNOW BEFORE YOU GO – UZBEKISTAN TRAVEL TIPS:

  • Everything you need to know about traveling independently to Uzbekistan:

Backpacking in Uzbekistan – The Complete Guide for the Independent Traveler

 

 

 

 

 

Disclaimer:

* This publication is made possible by the support of the American People through the United States Agency for International Development (USAID) Competitiveness, Trade, and Jobs Activity in Central Asia. The contents of this publication are the sole responsibility of Cynthia of Journal of Nomads and do not necessarily reflect the views of USAID or the United States Government.

 

**This article contains affiliate links. This means that if you purchase a product through one of these links, we’ll receive a small commission at no extra costs for you. Thank you!

 

 

Follow Cynthia - Journal of Nomads:

Writer, travel photographer, Panasonic Lumix Ambassador and co-founder of Journal of Nomads

I have Belgian roots but the world has been my home for the past 8 years. I'm an artist at heart and often get lost in my thoughts. I like to create some-thing out of no-thing and once I feel inspired, I'm unstoppable. I love telling stories and taking photos, showing the beauty and extraordinary of the world around me. Oh, and I love making the impossible elegantly probable. Once you realize that you're a creator and the world is your playfield, there's no limit to what can be done!

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